brotherpeacemaker

It's about our community and our spirituality!

Changing The Debate From Them To Me

AllAboutMe

”As for Obama, yeah, he’s a politician and only went to the church as a political ploy. But he spoke truth. And if he helped one black man to see where he needed to be it was well worth it. I only called him ‘the current black leader’ in an earlier post because black people in general embraced him as such since none other since MLK. However, the so-called bastions of all things black wasted an opportunity. Instead of hopping on the train (or getting out of the way) like a good little black soldier supposedly does when one of us takes the reins, the critics nitpicked and disparaged his approach and stances. I guess there really is more to it than to be black, popular and enticing black people to make positive choices for themselves and the race; I guess black unity is less important than getting white folks to see just how instrumental they are to black stagnation. We’ve got to change focus from them to us. Because no law is going to change ‘Ned’ from work into a black advocate. Why are we so quick to jump on a black person who has hundreds of millions and speaks truth from his mansion that he worked hard for, but we’re afraid to tell Shaniqua the truth-you have power insurmountable if you just keep your legs closed and establish a standard for a man (like a real commitment such as marriage before sex), and one day you’ll be respected in the way you and your future children deserve. She needs our critical attention and love ten times more than Cosby-he’s GOT what he needs.”Carlton

What truth did Mr. Obama speak? More black men are failing in their responsibility to their children than any other race? Is that the truth you believe Mr. Obama speaks? If so, please enlighten me with the numbers that support his truth. But what I believe is that Mr. Obama, Mr. Cosby, and you are more than ready to march in step with popular beliefs that support negative stereotypes about black people. Mr. Obama stiff arms the black community to keep us at bay while steadily embracing the hardworking Americans of the Appalachians and the banjo playing Ozarks. Mr. Obama worked hard to win over the favor of politically geographic areas that were inherently against any Democrat for President, let alone a black one. And to win the favor of these people Mr. Obama is willing to prove he was no cake walk for black people by embracing stereotypes without merit simply because it is popular among the racially generic dominant community that is predominantly white. Mr. Obama likes to play the game a lot of black people like to play in order to reach individual goals and successes. You roll in very successful company.

Mr. Obama has proven that he is not automatically sympathetic to the black community. He is far from being the leader of the black community. As many people have said Mr. Obama never tried to be the President of the black community. He wanted to be the President of America at large. Therefore, it is rather disingenuous for you to call Mr. Obama the leader of the black community and black people must hop on some train like good little soldiers. Shouldn’t white people be good little soldiers as well? You have stated over and over again about how strongly you refuse to follow any black leader but then turn around and say “the so-called bastions of all things black wasted an opportunity.” Now that sounds like hypocrisy.

And typically for black people who focus on individual success at the expense of community success, there is an attempt to paint a call for unity in the black community as trying to convince “white folks to see just how instrumental they are to black stagnation.” You assume much. It’s as if you’re coming here to this discussion with all the baggage of your previous conversations with anybody who disagrees with you about your beliefs on black people individually and the black community as a whole and are dumping all of your assumptions here. There isn’t a single statement in this entire blog since the day it was conceived two years ago about black people convincing white people how instrumental they are to black stagnation. Without a doubt that is a rather small minded summarization of the points being made here about the black community struggle.

You mentioned that we have to change the focus from “them” to “us”. But from everything you’ve written about individual successes, what you really mean is that we have to change the focus from “them” to “me”, me being the individual that doesn’t care about the greater good. The only thing that matters in black unity is individual success. With such a limited concept of community, you would celebrate the success of the individual who makes his or her living stealing or manipulating others in the community.

I have an idea for one of your clients that has the potential to make him or her more successful than could have been imagined. The person can dress up in rags, put a leash around the neck, and stand on the side of a busy intersection with a sign saying will coon for food. The deal is that he or she can rent him or her self out as a coon for white people. Don’t say no to any opportunity to give a white person the leash so the white person can lead the black person around. In a short time, that person will have so much business he or she would have to hire other black people willing to coon off a leash. It would be a mega sensation. The original coon would be reaching others to teach others so that will fit your definition of black community. It is a win-win situation for you meager definition of black community.

I hope you realize I’m not serious. But I wouldn’t be surprised to see someone try this and become a star bigger than Oprah and Cosby combined.

”[T]he conservatives love it when we’re doing exactly this-fighting over a week about some heartfelt comment made by a lady who loves her black man and children. I don’t need your approval or to ‘win’ this difference of opinion. I have children I’ve invested in since 1992 calling me up and saying what a difference I made to them and the difference they are making in the world today because of time I spent and things I said. Their actions speak to me louder than any smug point made in a blog ever could. Good luck in your travels-I’ll continue to watch your journey…but from here on in, from afar. I refuse to be a part of black dis-unity.” – Carlton

Who is fighting? I’m reaching one to teach one. You have the nerve to talk about black “dis-unity” and yet you were the one coming here to defend the honor of some white woman from me. I’m trying to show the people who may come to this blog, who might have some empathy for the black community, how irrational some of the thought processes are for some people who insist that they love the black community as wel but do not hesitate to adhere to unsubstantiated racial stereotypes that do little to help black people individually or as a whole and a lot to support myths of black inferiority.

You don’t need my approval? Of course not. You have all those phone calls giving you all the approval you will ever need. One has to wonder why you even bother coming here at all. But then again, there was that white woman married to a black man that I disagreed with that you were compelled to defend. If you are not trying to win an argument, that’s a very good thing. The way your reasoning unravels under the simplest application of logic, I seriously doubt if you would succeed at winning anything here.

Good luck with those phone calls! And thanks for being my inspiration for so many articles.

Thursday, May 21, 2009 - Posted by | African Americans, Black Community, Black Culture, Black People, Carlton, Life, Thoughts

21 Comments »

  1. Glad I could help, my brother.

    Comment by Carlton | Friday, May 22, 2009 | Reply

  2. I would like to think that you truly are.

    Peace

    Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Friday, May 22, 2009 | Reply

    • That was truly sincere. I’m still a big fan. I think there’s a lot people can learn from your blog (especially our past exchanges). Besides, we fundamentally agree on everything except how to get where we should be and whether we should nitpick black folks who have done well despite the odds against them. Well, then there’s that other thing where I don’t think clowns and self-hating blacks have ANY effect on whether I personally am able to earn respect from people of other races that have open minds. I mean, how many of us look at George W. Bush and say “Boy, white people sure hate us.” If we do, we need serious help. You can’t extrapolate from George to all of the white race.

      Comment by Carlton | Friday, May 22, 2009 | Reply

      • I understand what you’re saying and I have to disagree. A culture that elects a leader can be judged by that leader. If we collectively voted for George Bush to be our leader then it is only natural that we be judged by the quality of Mr. Bush’s leadership. We cannot elect him as a leader and then say he doesn’t reflect our collective values. I never voted for the man but I know that I live in a culture that would allow this poor excuse for a leader to exist as the most powerful person in the free world. What does that say about our collective when we elect a man that would sit back on his ranch on vacation while a thousand people die from the flooding in New Orleans? To me it speaks volumes. To me, it says that we are in need of serious help. And I’m not talking about just white people. I’m talking about all the people in this country, the national collective. Because although I talk about the dominant community, all of us are culpable when we sit back and allow it to happen out of fear that we are too weak to make change.

        Peace

        Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Friday, May 22, 2009

  3. “”[T]he conservatives love it when we’re doing exactly this-fighting… ”

    I wouldn’t go that far Carlton..I would ask WHICH conservatives you might be referring to. I personally am conservative, AND white, but to see infighting amongst blacks does not please me, does not help me, but in fact saddens me.

    Comment by Mike Lovell | Friday, May 22, 2009 | Reply

    • Sorry you got caught up in my genaralities, Mike. But the so-called “voices” of conservatism present a different picture. If the racist attitudes and the cheerleading that they do when the black race falters is offensive to you or other conservatives, we need the kind of shouting and disagreements with these specific pundits coming from you as loudly as those same pundits demanded American Muslims denounce people who had hijacked their religion back in 2001. But then, maybe you do that. I’ve never been to your site. Once again, sincerest apologies.

      Comment by Carlton | Monday, May 25, 2009 | Reply

  4. BROTHERPEACEMAKER,I’M ONLY GETTING PART OF THE GIST AS I JUST SEE THIS POST AND YOUR ENGLISH IS DEEP BUT I MUST SAY THIS ABOUT OUR FIRST BLACK PRESIDENT OBAMA! DID YOU KNOW THAT 10 YEARS AGO A NIGERIAN PROPHET PREDICTED THAT A BLACK MAN WOULD HEAD THE GREATEST NATION IN THE WORLD? OBAMA IS ORDAINED BY GOD( AS MINISTER LOUIS FARRAKAN ALSO SAID)TO BEGIN THE STRUGGLE OF THE BLACK RACE RISING AGAIN IN THE WORLD! IT IS SENDING OUT THE MESSAGE TO ALL BLACK PEOPLE IN AFRICA,THE CARRIBEAN AND WE BLACKamerikkkans TO GET OUR STUFF TOGETHER! NOW AS MINISTER FARRAKAN HAS SAID BLACK LEADERS HAVE THE MOST IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY WHICH OBAMA CAN NEVER PLAY! WE MUST NOW MOVE ON UPLIFTING OUR PEOPLE AND MAKING A BLACK AGENDA FOR OBAMA TO ANSWER TO. WE MUST BELIEVE THAT WE CAN SOLVE OUR PROBLEMS WITH GOD WHICH EVER CHURCH/MOSQUE/TEMPLE/SHINE YOU GO TO CAUSE THIS IS GOD’S PLAN! AFRICANS HAVE TO DEMAND FOR CORRECT BLACK LEADERS AND REPLACE ALL THE CORRUPT ONES NOW IN AFRICA! BLACKS IN TINY BELIZE,THE FIRST COUNTRY TO FOLLOW IN OBAMA’S LEAD,ELECTED their FIRST BLACK PRIME MINISTER,AND THEY BEING THE BOTTOM,WRETCHED OF THE EARTH THERE! YES WE WILL! WE ALREADY HAVE STARTED LOOKING FOR OUR OBAMAS IN NIGERIA,IN KENYA ETC.AND THE BLACK RACE IS GONNA RISE! EACH BLACK PERSON HAS THEIR RESPONSIBILITY AND EACH BLACK LEADER IN EACH COUNTRY MORE RESPONSIBLITY!(AS FOR OBAMA NOT BELIEVING IN CHURCH AND GOD YOU DON’T KNOW WHAT YOU ARE SAYING-HE HAD 100 PASTORS PRAYING FOR HIM AND EVEN NOW ON HIS SITES PEOPLE ARE PRAYING FOR HIM AND HE IS PRAYING AS HE MAKES/FOLLOWS THESE GOD ANOINTED ACTIONS! HE IS NOT RUSHED FOR A CHURCH YET DUE THE TROUBLE HE HAD BEFORE-WANTS TO BE VERY SURE OF THE CHURCH)! SO BLACK PEOPLE ARISE AND DO THE HARD WORK GOD IS DEMANDING! ASK GOD EVERYDAY WHAT YOU CAN DO TO UPLIFT THE BLACK RACE AND HE WILL GUIDE AND ENABLE YOU TO DO MIRACLES LIKE WE HAVE SEEN IN OBAMA’S RISE!

    YOUR SISTER FROM LAWRENCE,KANSAS WHO 31 YEARS AGO WENT BACK TO AFRICA(YORUBALAND,NIGERIA)TO RAISE YORUBA CHILDREN,
    YEYE AKILIMALI FUNUA OLADE
    yeyeolade.wordpress.com

    Comment by Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade | Saturday, May 23, 2009 | Reply

    • I’m sorry Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade,

      But the idea that Mr. Obama is ordained by god to begin the struggle of the black race rising is truly far fetched. Mr. Obama is no agent of change on behalf of the black community. He is a defender of the status quo. Just listen to some of the things he has to say about the protection of Israel or how he plans to retain his authority as president to determine who is a threat to the United States and can be locked away with no day in court. And I wouldn’t care if Mr. Obama had a million pastors praying for him. He isn’t about to change because a bunch of people somewhere are praying for him. His change comes and goes with the ebb and flow of political power.

      Peace

      Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Saturday, May 23, 2009 | Reply

      • OBAMA IS THE BEGINNING OF THE MOVEMENT OF THE BLACK RACE BACK TO THE TOP! NOT THAT ANYONE CAN BE A amerikkkan prez and not follow the mafia/military/industrial/complex! WHAT OLODUMARE(GOD) MEANS HIM TO BE IS DIFFERENT FROM WHAT WHITES WANT HIM TO BE. BLACKS WILL CHANGE BECAUSE THIS IS GOD’S SIGNAL TO US THAT EVERYTHING MUST CHANGE IN THE BLACK WORLD/AFRICA! GOOD LEADERS MUST RISE AND TAKE OVER. amerikkka may be delayed infalling but it will fall! OBAMA IS OUR MERCY,AS FARRAKAN SAID TO US BLACKS TO MOVE AND MOVE WE WILL! ANY OTHER THING OBAMA MANAGED TO DO IS SECONDARY! THIS CALL TO THE BLACK RACE WILL AND IS BEING ANSWERED IN NIGERIA NOW!TOO BAD YOU DON’T GIVE HIM CREDIT FOR THE MIRACLES HE HAS EVEN DONE IN amerikkka that no one could have done without OLODUMARE! WELL EVEN YOU WILL SEE IN TIME,BROTHERPEACEMAKER,OLORISHA!

        Comment by Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade | Wednesday, May 27, 2009

      • Yeye Akilimali Funua Olade,

        You must have a very broad definition of what constitutes a miracle. I have yet to see any miracles by Mr. Obama or anyone else in government these days. The corporate entities control way too much political power in America for anyone to do much in the way of miracles.

        And Olodumare won’t force Mr. Obama to do anything Mr. Obama doesn’t want to do or be something that Mr. Obama doesn’t want to be. It is Mr. Obama’s choice. And right now he chooses to follow in the traditions of his predecessors. In my humble opinion the idea that the Supreme Being would rely on any man to do miracles is very suspect.

        Peace

        Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Wednesday, May 27, 2009

  5. “if you just keep your legs closed”

    Wow, offensive. There are ways to say things but you are worse then any street hoodlum you so highly detest.

    In addition, Carlton seems undereducated rather than simply someone with a different opinion. I cannot help but think this. Does he not know that the fall of “black unity” and extreme individualism are the reasons for the lack of progress we have seen over the last 40 years? Cartlon, do you know your real history from about 1965 to the present. I feel that many gloss over this so we are unable to connect dots.

    Comment by RhondaCoca | Saturday, May 23, 2009 | Reply

    • Ms. RhondaCoca,
      I already said in an earlier post that the extreme individualism of the American Black race is the reason for the slow progression of us as a people. I just happen to think it is worth it. Individual people who disagree initially with my stances(in my honest opinion) respect my opinion more when it comes from a place as an individual explaining his logic rather than as a spouting regurgitation of the “groupthink” onslaught that most of us will reject parts of anyway (weakening the argument even more for those who oppose all of it anyway)and therefore deliver it with lower amounts of zeal and commitment.
      For instance, as I said before, Obama was the most respected black man among black people for quite a while. But instead of us all black folks jumping in and taking advantage of that to advance our concerns, we have nitpicked and highlighted our disagreements with him; making him oh so much more vulnerable and less potent. It’s time for us to admit that we aren’t as ready to give up our individualism as we project. We aren’t looking for the next great black leader…we are looking for the next great black leader that fits into our personal little pigeonhole definition of what ‘black’ is.
      I’m sorry that my “legs closed” comment offends you but the kids I work with appreciate bold honesty. They can smell BS from a mile away and I don’t come at them from a moralizing standpoint. Delaying gratification is just good insurance and they see my point and know I’m not just some out of touch bible-thumper who is telling them that a baby at 16 is going to ruin their life or that they are guaranteed to get some STD that will kill them two weeks later if they have unprotected sex or don’t completely abstain. They know these things aren’t true-they see it in the streets they live on everyday. If their mom is “making it” after being a single teenage mom 1) why would I want any “better”? and 2) Why are these “dreams” other people tout necessarily any “better” than what I’m choosing for myself at this moment?” We have to get these young people to find themselves worthy and able of other options. I do that well despite Jesse Jackson’s opinion that such focus on negative consequences of certain decisions some of us make is demeaning and “talking down to black people”. I respectfully disagree. My speech (just like Obama’s and Cosby’s) says that “you are capable and expected to do better because such negative behavior ain’t black-it’s ghetto and holding us back as a people.” The fact that we won’t speak truth to power is the reason the movement began to lose power. We got so caught up in Black Pride and who is black enough to lead us, we have forgotten Black Performance and personal responsibility.

      Comment by Carlton | Monday, May 25, 2009 | Reply

    • And where did I say I detest ANYbody? I don’t have that kind of hate in my heart for anyone; that kind of sentiment only destroys from within.

      Comment by Carlton | Monday, May 25, 2009 | Reply

    • And don’t be so disheartened by our slow, steady progress. The African proverb about The Tortoise and the Hare touts slow and steady progress as commendable.

      Comment by Carlton | Monday, May 25, 2009 | Reply

    • If only we were experiencing progress. Like I said before, we as a community are sinking. Too many black people want to practice individualism instead of anything that can be considered black socialism. Like you said, these days black people have to spend time proving to the guy in the cubicle next to us that we are not a threat to his lifestyle when back in the day we didn’t hesitate to challenge and change white people’s lifestyle. That’s not hardly progress.

      Peace

      Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Tuesday, May 26, 2009 | Reply

  6. It helps me to look at it thusly: if every black child we convince to value his future and therefore the future of his/her children’s futures succeeds in being happy and raising happy children, the race is saved by default.
    On the other hand, making that guy in the cubicle next to me feel put upon and forced into whatever action we deem as a people is his responsibility to help us in “our” movement ain’t going to be nearly as stable as what we do for ourselves and each other. I just want that guy out of my and my children’s way (unless I can convince him to volunteer his help).
    A perfect illustration is our discussion over the last couple of weeks. I’ve been trying to get you to see how we are two pieces of the same puzzle. However, I get the distinct impression that you feel we are more like two different solutions to a very linear problem and that your solution is more efficient and my solution gets in the way of yours. That last statement may well be true. But here’s the rub. I can’t do things any other way and be happy. I’m not made the way you are. But the movement needs us both because not all youth are the same either. Some will respond better to you-some to me. When I see some young person I’m working with not responding or getting frustrated with me, I send them to another brother in the city I know who is a lot less like me. He does the same. It works. He had to be convinced, though. It seems anyone who preaches inclusion, diversity, personal growth, and love is suspect.
    As for the sinking of the black race, my newest kick has been to try and get more upstanding black folks to become foster parents and mentor these poor black parents the system has chewed up. The response is helpful two-fold: the parent gets a mentor that truly has an interest in his/her success and the child gets to see another side of black life. It amazes me how some of us will take in an abandoned pit puppy quicker than we will some poor 8 year old boy who is destined to find a gang family in two years if we don’t become his influence instead.

    Comment by Carlton | Tuesday, May 26, 2009 | Reply

  7. Carlton,

    But here’s the problem I see when we fail to teach our children reverence for the black community, black people who become successful and abandon the black community, or obtain their success at the expense of the black community.

    For example, back in the era of America’s institutionalized slavery, black people were employed to help keep enslaved black people from running away. Or, if blacks did run away, black people were used to track them down and bring them back. The black man who makes his success at the expense of the black community is not helpful for the black community. A black person who makes a good living off of stealing from other black person is in no way, shape or form a boon to the black community. A black person who makes a good living by licking white people’s boots is not a benefit for the black community. The race is not being saved by their default. The community is being corroded from the inside when people choose to follow an agenda that runs contrary to what is helpful for the larger black population. The dominant community is quick to reward behavior that shows black people as subservient to stereotypes that protect racial disparity.

    As a community, when we come together for an agenda to teach our youth, we can offer a variety of options for their development. But we have to approach it as a community of people with the same interest. When we start including people with selfish motives in our mix, we will run into problems and have people who will work to undermine the community philosophy. We don’t need people who do not have a sense of black community in our black community.

    If you see us as working together then you must see us as elements of the same community working towards the same purpose. That’s cool if it was true. However, I must admit that I don’t get that sense of making community objectives a priority from you. From your past statements, you appear to be the type of brother who wants to focus on putting white people at ease so that they will volunteer their support. I’m not interested in prostrating myself in order to get somebody’s support. People know when other people need help. And the process of putting the guy in the cubicle at ease isn’t working for the black community.

    Your premise of putting the guy in the next cube at ease has one huge flaw. It assumes that I have a job in the cubicle and we therefore have some sense of parity. But that’s simply not the case. More than likely, black people will be the unemployed person standing outside the building with the cubicles trying just to get fair consideration for a job or employment opportunity. Why is it that the guy in your proverbial cube doesn’t have to spend time trying to win the black community’s approval? You approach the problem from a point of weakness trying to prove that you don’t want to upset the status quo. And if you don’t want to upset the status quo then the black community is forever deemed working to prove that we are no threat to a culture that naturally gives white people an advantage over black people.

    Peace

    Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Tuesday, May 26, 2009 | Reply

  8. I see your point well and its a good one (about the guy in the cubicle). However, I DON’T want to upset the status quo in most areas (bum rush it and flip the table, so to speak). I want people to want to change over time. There is permanancy in that. If we don’t want white people screwing up our culture, why are we trying to infringe on theirs? Most of the problems with the Black race (at this point) is due to poor choices that are magnified by the discrimination. Say, for example, in college I have a white roommate. He parties 3 times a week and asks me with him. We both graduate with a “C” average. We both eye the same job with a white corporation. I have to be aware that as a black man, the chances of me beating him out is pretty darn slim. I may not even beat him out if I had an “A” average, but at least I have a fighting chance. There’s no law we can make that can change that. White corporations throw out resumes from Kareem Jenkins and Taneisha Powell without even looking at them, but will at least skim the ones from Thomas Jones and Elizabeth Morris. How do you word a law to change that situation? You can’t-not without furthering the chasm between the races. The only way to beat that is to win over hearts one at a time. Because if I am Spike Lee and want to have a 75% black staff, why should I catch hell from the media or Congress? Therefore, if I run IBM, as a white dude, why am I catching hell for have 75% white folks on staff? We have to treat everyone like we’d want to be treated. If I can’t win you over as a white brother to see there needs to be some parity if you’re going to call yourself my white brother, I neutralize you or move on; I don’t try to subjugate you. That just sets war up-one that will be difficult for us to win (how do you fight Limbaugh and his minions that say blacks (or gays) don’t want respect, we want to be the dominate culture and to define everything). The only way to fight that is to be successful and get a little power. Join that power with someone who has your goals and make a difference-if you’re black, that’s a BLACK difference, no doubt about it. I understand that we are losing some of our culture but you have to appeal to individual parents to get back to their proud roots or if they are unaware of them, ensure their children have access to that information by teaching every black child you meet about themselves from a broad perspective. The one reason I’m not a member of Black Social Workers Association is their stance on black adoption. They would rather a child sit in foster care or an orphange for 18 years rather than be adopted out to a white family. I want that black child loved and taken care of-despite the color of his/her parents. If he grows up to be self-hating and yet motivated to excel because of the love he knew, I’d rather see that than him languishing in foster care only to be kicked out at 18 to go back to the streets poorly skilled, feeling alone, diconnected, and angry. He has a better chance at learning to love himself at some point in his life (and his people of origin) as time passes than he has of recuperating from the 70% chance that he will be incarcerated or homeless within a year of leaving foster care (a true statistic) if he lives his childhood in a group home.
    It’s important to remember this: all success is at the cost of someone else. In economics, it’s called opportunity cost. There are finite jobs and opportunities. Not everyone can make $400 million like Limbaugh. So yes, sometimes the competition will be against and at the expense of my “brother”. Even if blacks owned every corporation in America, that’s the way it would be. The truth is that some people (both black and white) who own the means of production are going to hold the quota of people who aren’t their color to a certain limit. What can I do about that except point it out to others? Government jobs should be more progressive, but I can’t see us making laws about how a PRIVATE corporation has to behave on things like dress codes or even concessions for religion. If I tell you before you apply for the job that it requires work on Saturday, you let me hire you, then tell me you are Seventh Day Adventist and can’t work on Saturdays, why does my business have to suffer because of your cultural stuff? We are all just players of the game (unless we live alone on a desert island). There’s only so much we can do to change the game-we gotta appeal to the individual souls of the players.
    But if you want to assume your way is the best and only way, that’s fine. But be ready to do this exercise: give up some things about yourself for this abstract called Black Oneness. If done today, an election of The Next Black Leader would probably be Barack Obama. Considering that and the centrist that Mr. Obama is, you would have to change a lot about yourself to join The Movement. What are you willing to sacrifice (NOT even blog about)even if you disagree with choices he makes for us all as black people? Better yet, what things are you NOT willing to sacrifice? Those things are the reason we don’t have a current black leader.

    Comment by Carlton | Friday, May 29, 2009 | Reply

    • Carlton,

      ”I see your point well and its a good one (about the guy in the cubicle). However, I DON’T want to upset the status quo in most areas (bum rush it and flip the table, so to speak). I want people to want to change over time. There is permanancy in that. If we don’t want white people screwing up our culture, why are we trying to infringe on theirs? “

      But the major problem with your strategy is that it changes nothing. Your perception is that it is better for the black community if we get permission from the dominant community to participate in their culture. You imply that black people having jobs is an infringement on white people as if we are not entitled to have jobs, educational opportunities, housing, and such. You talk as if black people demanding a fair shot at opportunities are an unfair imposition against the white community. You are correct in your statement that you want to maintain this arrangement. And, sadly, you are more likely to work to protect this arrangement where white people feel entitled to reject black people at their discretion, instead of working to empower the black community.

      A black person working in corporate America is not a black person trying to screw up white people’s culture. It is a fact of life that in order to be able to pursue life, liberty, and happiness in America, it is necessary to have a job. It is mandatory to have an education. We need these opportunities just as much as the white community does. The status quo needs to change. Unfortunately, that is one point of my argument that you cannot see.

      ”Most of the problems with the Black race (at this point) is due to poor choices that are magnified by the discrimination. Say, for example, in college I have a white roommate. He parties 3 times a week and asks me with him. We both graduate with a ‘C’ average. We both eye the same job with a white corporation. I have to be aware that as a black man, the chances of me beating him out is pretty darn slim. I may not even beat him out if I had an ‘A’ average, but at least I have a fighting chance.”

      This is little more than another weak justification for racial disparity based on nothing but an unsubstantiated racial stereotype. How do you judge most of the problems stem from the poor choices that black people make?

      A study by Devah Pager, an Associate Professor of Sociology and Faculty Associate of the Office of Population Research at Princeton University conducting research focused on racial stratification in education, labor markets, and the criminal justice system, did a study where she discovered that a black person with a criminal record looking for employment opportunities had a callback rate of about five percent. Black testers without a criminal record had a callback rate of fourteen percent. But white testers with a criminal record had a callback rate of seventeen percent with a criminal record and thirty four percent without. A white man with a criminal conviction has a better chance of getting a job than a black man who keeps his nose clean. So how does this equate to black people’s poor choices and not the racism associated with the status quo that you are trying to defend and protect?

      ” There’s no law we can make that can change that.”

      You are so correct. There is no law we can write to change things especially when we don’t even try because too many people don’t want to upset the status quo.

      ”White corporations throw out resumes from Kareem Jenkins and Taneisha Powell without even looking at them, but will at least skim the ones from Thomas Jones and Elizabeth Morris. How do you word a law to change that situation? You can’t-not without furthering the chasm between the races. The only way to beat that is to win over hearts one at a time.”

      So the act of corporations throwing resumes out because names sound too ethnic is not furthering the chasm between the races. Is that your contention? Somehow the black community is supposed to be content with the fact that our resumes get rejected based on nothing but the sound of a name. We have to adapt and change everything we are to fit the parameters corporate America deems acceptable. And why should corporate America make change when there are so many people like you who say this behavior is okay because we can’t write any laws to change it?

      I say screw writing laws. If a corporation doesn’t want to support the black community then the black community should respond likewise. It’s not hard. All it takes is a sense of community. But that would mean black people working together and we know how you feel about that. It’s better if we prove that we like the status quo exactly the way it is and that way a handful of us will get the jobs and lead the good life so we won’t make too much of an imposition on white cultures and they can continue to hold all the cards.

      ” We have to treat everyone like we’d want to be treated.”

      Doesn’t this philosophy apply to people who control corporate America? Why aren’t you calling them out the way you claim to do in one of your previous comments? Wrong is wrong, remember?

      ” If I can’t win you over as a white brother to see there needs to be some parity if you’re going to call yourself my white brother, I neutralize you or move on; I don’t try to subjugate you.”

      Who is trying to subjugate the white brothers? It is amazing the number of people who see a call for equal and fair treatment across racial lines as the subjugation of white people. And you neutralize the white brother? Somehow I seriously doubt it. You said yourself you don’t want to do anything to disturb the status quo.

      Peace

      Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Saturday, May 30, 2009 | Reply

      • I’ve only got this to say: You obviously confuse my willingness to be quietly persuasive with being a doormat for “the man”. The two are not necessarily related. And with me, they are not even cousins.

        Comment by Carlton | Sunday, May 31, 2009

      • Carlton,

        You’ve had a lot to say. They may not have been related, but it is what you’ve been saying from the beginning. I doubt if I’ve confused anything. Maybe you’ve simply confused tolerance for racial discrimination as bold action for some kind of change.

        Peace

        Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Sunday, May 31, 2009


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: