brotherpeacemaker

It's about our community and our spirituality!

It Was All About Changing Laws And Not About Equality

blackgavel

”The movement of the 60’s was about changing laws in large part. Most of that work was accomplished. Most of the barriers we face right now are put up by individual private enterprises and persons, ourselves, and institutional practices ignorant to cultural biases. I’m into pointing out institutional and individual biases, but our main focus as black people has to be ourselves. I can’t make IBM be sensitive to my cultural issues or force some conservative to be open to hiring some of my ‘delinquents’ despite the totally incongruent way they may have been treated by the system. But what I CAN do is get the young people I work with to see that if they have a dream, they don’t have to wait for barriers to be lifted. Sure it’s going to be harder for them to get some things done than their white age mates. But they are the minority population in this country. Whites would be having the same problems we do if there were fewer of them than us-it’s intrinsic.”Carlton

The purpose of the civil rights era was equality for people of color. The goal wasn’t to change laws. Changing laws was one of the steps in the long road towards true equality. When the civil rights laws passed, the leaders of the movement didn’t hang up their hat and started patting themselves on the back and telling each other job well done. Again, you chose to follow the most simplistic interpretation to the study of black history.

The barriers the black community faces today are the same barriers our ancestors and elders faced more than a generation ago. That barrier is people from the dominant community who refuse to accept black people as an equal in the national community because of racial and cultural biases. These are the same racial biases that cause the collective of people who share them to work in unison to suppress opportunity for people in the black community. This is the foundation for the condition you wish to ignore or pretend doesn’t exist and label as The Great White Conspiracy. You see, you really do understand even though you try to act like you don’t. You appear to be suffering from a serious case of self imposed denial.

You alone may not be able to inspire IBM to be more sensitive to black community issues, especially when you refuse to even try. However, if black people were to work as a community of people with a common interest, our combined effort could have more of an impact for change. That’s how our ancestors and elders were able to break the segregationist policies of the Montgomery, Alabama bus company. One person cannot affect change on their own. A community of people can. By refusing to teach our youth the complete picture of race relations in America people like you are actually removing our single best counter to the removal of social barriers, a well aware black community.

A lot of people like to point to a single successful black person as proof that we can overcome the obstacles that keep the majority of black people from participating as true equals. Now that we have a black President we want to tell our black children that any black person can be the next President. But according to Bureau of Justice Statistics, the reality is that the same system that Mr. Obama managed to maneuver to become our country’s first black President is the same system that in 2002 alone accounted for nearly six hundred thousand new black inmates in our state and federal prison systems. If we were to give our black children the complete picture we would be saying that you could believe in yourself and become President one day, but in all honesty you are nearly sixty million percent more likely to become another statistic of our prison system.

” Whites would be having the same problems we do if there were fewer of them than us…” – Carlton

What fiction is this statement based on? What point does would of, should of, or could of arguments play in these discussions about the reality of our situation? If white people were from Krypton and black people were made of kryptonite then we wouldn’t have this problem. But nobody is from Krypton and nobody is made of kryptonite. Similarly, white people are not the minority here and white people are not having the same problem as people in the black community.

However, if you look at what happened in South Africa, you cannot simply say that white people in the minority would be victimized. The same thing happened in a number of Caribbean Islands. A minority of white people took advantage of an ill prepared native population. It has happened all over the world. Stop pulling useless arguments based on conjecture and imagination out of the air to support your position. It is not humanly instrinsic that a racial minority must suffer the wrath of a larger majority.

Peace

Wednesday, May 20, 2009 - Posted by | African Americans, Black Community, Black Culture, Black People, Carlton, Life, Racism, Thoughts

13 Comments »

  1. Just one comment to something you said that distorts reality. South Africa and the Carribeans were propped up by imperial regimes that had endless streams of white people with guns and missles who weren’t afraid to use them (or at least gave that illusion that they would). So are we going to take a bazooka down to Wall Street; hold an Uzi to the heads of the corporate gods? We are less than 20%. We don’t have the resources of Mother Africa behind us. I have Afrikaan friends. They are polite, but to be truthful they think of American Blacks as mud people and a little beneath them.
    I’ve spent time in Mexico-white people are crap down there. They aren’t allowed to own land. Outsiders in the Orient and Sudan are ostrasized and treated as funny little pets. They aren’t respected as equal humans. We ALL do it once we become powerful…it corrupts us ALL.
    Oh, well since I broke my own promise to not come back and fight with you about your opinions on blackness, I’ll go ahead and refute your other argument. The goal may have been to establish equality, but as you will readily admit, some half a century later, that hasn’t happened. As long as we have people of all colors teaching their children that the motives of people who don’t look like them aren’t pure based purely on history, we will have racial inequality. Tell me the how you would word one law that will make IBM bend to your will and allow a brother to wear a dashiki and dreads to work if that’s where he is culturally and considers a tailored three piece blasphemy to his soul; the war garment of his would-be prison guards? Such a law would not wash. Or maybe we can shame corporate America to bow to our cultural sensitivities…yeah, right. The only way that will happen is if we as individuals can convince the guy whose cubicle is next to mine that my interests don’t threaten his and enlist them in our fight. It’s what Martin did and the reason Malcom was killed in the end as a traitor-they focused on our human sameness in the end. And that, my good sir is the true meaning of…
    Peace

    Comment by Carlton | Thursday, May 21, 2009 | Reply

  2. Allow me to clarify the Africa point. My Afrikaan friends all have made the Shaniqua argument as one of the major reasons the have a small amount of contempt for us. Instead of taking advantage of the laws that discourage the tribal prejudice that is pervasive in their own mother land, we spend all this time focusing on teaching our children what to look out for instead of showing them what to live up to; we don’t (as a group) take advantage of what has been offered us. If one were to do a study of how well Afrikaans were doing in America vs. American Blacks, one would see a disparity-one that American Blacks would be on the disadvantaged side of. How can that be? Aren’t they “blacker” than us who have lived here all our lives and know the system? Don’t they have language and cultural barriers that should be holding them down and destroying their school performance and yet, they consistently do better than us. Curious…

    Comment by Carlton | Thursday, May 21, 2009 | Reply

  3. Sup BPM, I’d like to respond to some of Carlton’s responses…

    “We are less than 20%”
    It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, look at South Africa. What’s the percentage of land owned and operated by my peoples divided by number of peoples, and compare that to the percentage of land owned and operated by others divided by the number of others. I don’t know the numbers, but that’s how I would measure the relative strength of any people in any land, as land is the foundation of the state.

    “We don’t have the resources of Mother Africa behind us.”
    You might not but I do. That includes more than the material, it includes the foundations of civilization and spirituality leaned on around the world to this day.
    I recognize Africa as my ancestral home and don’t require permission to look at Momma’s resources as my own, provided I respect Momma in the process. I’m sure She wouldn’t mind you feeling the same, nor our kindred back home would mind, provided you’d respect Momma and your kindred in the process. What I’ve heard is we’re way aggressive in the West and it turns our peeps off back home. But I bet if one were humble they’d be surprised how much support she/he could get.

    “they think of American Blacks as mud people and a little beneath them.”
    For someone to think someone’s below them implies they’re open to someone being above them, equality means we’re all equals, outside of racial group as well as inside. Your friends are opening themselves to developing an inferiority complex and you’d be a good friend to school them B4 it’s irreversible. Encourage them to continue to work harder than us, or anyone for that matter. I am so proud of my peeps from overseas who come here and excel, as I am so proud of my peeps in America who are here and excel, as I am so proud of anybody who excels quite frankly.
    But as for this mentality of “they don’t like us”, well you got me there because I don’t know what kind of friends you have, but the friends that I have made, from Zimbabwe, Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria, Ethiopia, and Eritrea, respected me, as I did them. Be a friend and introduce them to Black folks from the States handling their business, shine yourself, and don’t just bobblehead when they regurgitate the vomit of white supremacy.

    “I’ve spent time in Mexico-white people are crap down there. They aren’t allowed to own land. Outsiders in the Orient and Sudan are ostrasized and treated as funny little pets.”

    That’s cool to hear there’s somewhere whites can’t own land after half a millennium of going where they pleased and taking it most unscrupulously.

    “We ALL do it once we become powerful…it corrupts us ALL.”
    Any single example of uncorrupted power refutes this, but why would you assume people are all funky to begin with? Most people are cool and most people have no interest in subjugating others. I don’t think its the power that screws up the powerful, I think its the screwed up who’re more likely to crave power.

    “As long as we have people of all colors teaching their children that the motives of people who don’t look like them aren’t pure based purely on history, we will have racial inequality. ”
    Who the hell DOES teach their children the motive of any group IS based purely on history?? Don’t get me wrong, I’d LOVE, I mean LOVVVVE, if the prime directive within human thought was to base decisions purely off of history, all history, but as for expecting others to base all of their decisions from mad knowledge (or mad ignorance for that matter) of history is not only unrealistic, its dangerous!

    “…I’ll go ahead and refute your other argument…”
    I think he’s still waiting for you to refute the first one.

    “The goal may have been to establish equality, but as you will readily admit, some half a century later, that hasn’t happened.”
    Well I don’t look at it like equality is some external thing to be given, earned, taken, whatever. Equality is a state of mind where you don’t look up or down at another but are comfortable in your own skin, as it were. This frees the mind to move forth in peace and prosperity, w/o the distraction. From that perspective I think we’ve come light years in regaining our sanity as a people, and we have light years to go – not because we’re inadequate or we haven’t accomplished, but because its one of those goals like knowing God – or to lighten it a bit, knowing ANYTHING – the more you know the more you realize you don’t know diddly.

    This notion in a nutshell – noone’s free till we’re all free, and if you breathe oxygen its your responsibility to work towards that end.

    “Tell me the how you would word one law that will make IBM bend to your will and allow a brother to wear a dashiki and dreads to work if that’s where he is culturally and considers a tailored three piece blasphemy to his soul; the war garment of his would-be prison guards?”

    That’s easy, if that brotha is the sh1t IBM or any other competitive organization is going to STFU about dress code and offer homeboy some incentives. So as for a law to ‘bend’ whomever to our will, the real question is how to build sistas and brothas who are the sh!t.
    We could write a law that guarantees American Africans a free education and envrionmental protection, and the natural brilliance and hard work of my peeps can take care of the rest of it.
    As for the war garment part of that, I’d suppose that’s anything the descendant of any indigenous and/or imported soul would choose to wear, as we’re all technically prisoners of war. Its too sad that those who appreciate history, i.e. to recognize the value of history, and strive to learn from it are oft misinterpreted as far out when imho it’s those who ignore history and context life exclusively within the immediate are the wackos. Or to put it another way, if you recognize that if X does Y then Z will happen, all you have to do is in your heart connect yourself with X and suddenly there’s the impetus to give a damn about the past and see yourself within the larger tens (and maybe hundreds) of thousands of years context of the human ambition to improve the human condition. Along those lines, thanks for helping out with the youth, I think that’s cool.

    “The only way that will happen is if we as individuals can convince the guy whose cubicle is next to mine that my interests don’t threaten his and enlist them in our fight.”
    And the only way to clean a toilet is with a toothbrush, right? So what if I do threaten my cubicle neighbor – my actions should be based on whats right for me, not on whats comfortable for someone else… and thats no more what Martin did then why Malcolm was killed btw. They both were assasinated trying to make the world a better place, and they went about it completely different ways.

    A student of history would never think there’s ever only 1 way.

    Comment by Bless | Thursday, May 21, 2009 | Reply

  4. Thanks for the feedback Carlton,

    “Whites would be having the same problems we do if there were fewer of them…”Carlton

    “South Africa and the Carribeans were propped up by imperial regimes that had endless streams of white people with guns and missles who weren’t afraid to use them (or at least gave that illusion that they would).”Carlton

    “As for white unity-I have to insist that it’s an illusion…”Carlton

    Your made a statement saying white people would be in the same predicament if they were the minority. That’s simply not the case. It’s not a matter of numbers but a matter of community strength. Contrary to your belief that white people don’t work together, the white people who went to different parts of the world and took over did so because they saw themselves as a community unit against other communities. You said yourself that they were propped up by other white people who gave the illusion that they supported their colonies. But then you say that the support with the illusion of destruction was just an illusion because there is no white unity. Do you think about what you are saying and how it ties into what you have said before when you write or do you just make it up on the fly?

    As far as your previous statement claiming that white people are being treated like crap, there are white people being treated like crap every where. Duh! Have you seen Deliverance? You had to go all the way down to Mexico to find them? You have a tendency to take micro examples of issues and try to apply them to the whole. White people are not treated like crap in Mexico. In fact, it has become part and parcel of American culture for many white people to go to Mexico for vacations and spring breaks and to have a roaring good time complete with debauchery. The very idea that Mexico cultivates an atmosphere of treating white people unfairly is laughable. It is not racism that keeps white people from buying land in Mexico. That law is designed to keep any foreigner from buying Mexican land in restricted areas without establishing a real estate trust. Please, get your facts straight. Mexicans of European ancestry do relatively well in Mexico.

    “[Are] we going to take a bazooka down to Wall Street; hold an Uzi to the heads of the corporate gods? We are less than 20%. We don’t have the resources of Mother Africa behind us…”

    Our ancestors didn’t need bazookas or Uzis to change the climate of America. Why do you make such absurd rhetorical statements? People like Thurgood Marshall and Doctor King and others were able to make change because they had a strong community effort behind them. Mr. Marshall wasn’t taking orders from anyone. He saw how he could help the black community and did it without any weapon of destruction, not even a sling shot. With a self determining spirit our ancestors were able to stop Jim Crow, erase laws promoting concepts of separate but equal discrimination, and erase laws supporting unfair housing, employment, and education. The very idea that black people need weapons to make change is a concept that ranks right up there with the country of Mexico abusing white people.

    “As long as we have people of all colors teaching their children that the motives of people who don’t look like them aren’t pure based purely on history, we will have racial inequality.”

    So it must be your contention that our perpetual racial disparity and a tolerance for racial discrimination based on a foundation of historic, institutionalized dehumanization of people in the black community has nothing to do with racial inequality. Studying history has no application for how we proceed in the future. It is a wonder why we bother to teach history at all. But then again the problem isn’t the study of history, only the study of black history. The problem isn’t racial discrimination. The problem is actually paying attention to racial discrimination and teaching the black community how to respond to racial discrimination. Teaching black people how to take an active role in the black community isn’t good for the black community. It’s much better to pretend that our racial inequality will go away if we stop looking at it. Nobody says murder will go away if we stop looking at it. Nobody says rape will go away if we stop looking at it. But stop looking at racism and it will magically go away. Brilliant! And our culture has actually taught black people to promote this stick your head in the sand concept to people in the black community. More brilliance. We do it to ourselves.

    “Tell me the how you would word one law that will make IBM bend to your will and allow a brother to wear a dashiki and dreads to work if that’s where he is culturally and considers a tailored three piece blasphemy to his soul; the war garment of his would-be prison guards?”

    Leave it to a black man to minimize the struggle for fairness for black people to black people wearing a dashiki in corporate America. When women say they want fairness in the work place you probably think they want to wear bikinis and housecoats. It’s funny because in the fight for civil rights, I never saw Malcolm X, Doctor King, Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, Medgar Evers, or anyone else from that era wearing a dashiki. In all my years of working in corporate America, I’ve never met one black person that said they wanted to wear a dashiki into the work place. So where did you get the impression that fairness for black people was fairness for the dashiki? Who asked for a law to make the dashiki part of IBM’s corporate culture? May I suggest you direct your query to that person? I’d like to stick to the issue at hand which is fairness for black people and not for the recognition of racist cultural stereotypes.

    ”The only way that will happen is if we as individuals can convince the guy whose cubicle is next to mine that my interests don’t threaten his and enlist them in our fight.”

    And when the guy in the cube next to yours has interests that are designed to protect white privilege, you are more than happy to present yourself as a total submissive that is no threat to his or her superiority. That’s how many black people dealt with issues of inequality in the past. Back in the day, a lot of people did well by knowing their place at the plantation owner’s feet and becoming the house slave. They proved that they were no threat to the white privileged way of life and did relatively well compared to other black people. It worked well for some black people then. It works well for some black people today. But it doesn’t help the entire black community.

    I don’t have a problem teaching young blacks that they have to become respectful citizens of their local and national communities. I don’t have a problem teaching young blacks to work hard. Lord knows I have to work hard each and every day. Hard work is nothing to shy away from and helps to build character.

    But all the hard work in the world won’t amount to squat when somebody feels threatened about their interests which may run contrary to fairness for people in the black community. We have to prove that we are no threat to the dominant white community. But the dominant white community doesn’t have to prove jack squat to people in the black community. They don’t have to prove that they are fair. They don’t have to prove that they are inclusive. They don’t have to prove that they care one iota about the black community. And if a black people want jobs, they’d better prove that a strong black community is the furthest thing from their mind.

    Peace

    Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Thursday, May 21, 2009 | Reply

  5. How do you take a comment which suggest people of any color that teach their children that motives of people who don’t look like them aren’t pure. Then we have inequality, based on hx. No one even suggested black people quit studying hx. let alone black hx.

    When will you quit using it as a crutch? Hx is dangerous if we repeat. To imply white people don’t want you or any other black individual to study. I just say how can you delude yourself. Y ou say Peace to end your blog.

    I do not read one word that spreads peace. You attack everyone that doesn’t agree with “bpm” I thank goodness you are not negotiating for our world peace. Would you decide to punish one particular group? Possibly because you believe the dominant community does not have to prove “jack squat” as long as you spread anger, people like my self.

    Don’t think children can’t pick up on our negativity. No of us can fool a child .
    So watch what you say to people. Kids listen!!

    And if you want to spread your venom. Communities black, white, asian, will have to continue to go the extra mile to repair the negative message you enjoy spreading. What a Shame…

    Comment by Ellen | Thursday, May 21, 2009 | Reply

    • I must say I agree with Ellen here. A while ago I replied to one of these blogs with my opinion. As someone living in England my view of the issue may have been different to that of others, however I felt I was entitled to my opinion. What I got back was a list of arguments which seemed to contradict the original post and ended in the blogger calling me ”dense” and saying he was surprised I could learn anything. Reading more of these blogs over time I have come to realise that anyone who disagrees with the blog is not entitled to state their opinion but is instead accussed of having the wrong opinion. Is it me or amI right in thinking opinions are meant to be different and can’t be ”wrong”.

      At the end of the comment in which I had been called ”dense” the blogger said peace. I’m sorry but if that is your idea of peace there’s something terribly wrong.

      Comment by N | Saturday, September 5, 2009 | Reply

    • Thanks for the feedback N,

      But it is my opinion that the idea that you are an innocent victim of this blog who was simply trying to express your opinion is full of fiction and misleading. It is my opinion that you accused me of being racist for pointing out that Will Smith’s daughter was being pushed to have a white role model, Paris Hilton. Even when I tried to tell you that I have my own role models, many of whom are white, you continued to insist that I was only against Ms. Hilton because she was white and not because of her lack of character.

      After we went back and forth for a while and I realized there was no way to snap you out of your delusion, it was my opinion that you were dense and you simply are too thick in your beliefs to learn anything new. That is my opinion, so how can you say that I was wrong? You just wrote, “am I right in thinking opinions are meant to be different and can’t be wrong”. But right after you write that, you then turn around and say, “if this is your idea of peace there’s something terribly wrong”. You simply reconfirmed my opinion that trying to exchange ideas with you is a waste of time. You really don’t believe any of the things you say.

      If I thought you were a person of reason open to a respectful dialogue of differing opinions then you would be more than welcome to express your views as much as anyone else. But don’t think for a moment you can come here and attack me, use your replies to offer your opinion painting me as a racist, and then think that you would be welcomed with open arms.

      This blog is a reflection of me and I don’t care for people like you who, in my opinion, have poor manners. It is no different than you coming into my house, sitting on my sofa and start telling me how racist I am. I’d ask you to leave. If that didn’t work I’d tell you to leave. And if that still didn’t work, I’d make you regret the day you ever set foot in my house. And don’t think you’d ever be welcomed back with your little attitude.

      You are more than welcome to your opinion. But if you don’t have a more gracious way of interacting with your host then you are more than welcome to take your opinion somewhere else. You ain’t got to go home but you got to stay the hell away from here. And since that is my opinion how can it be wrong?

      Peace

      Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Saturday, September 5, 2009 | Reply

  6. Want to clarify my comment about white people not having toprove they are fair. I quoted you, as the dominat community does not have to prove “jack squat” to people in the black community.

    Why should the white community have to prove anything?

    Isn’t the message of peace, and true equality to quit proving and start treating each other, and everyone with respect, kindness.
    Extend a helping hand without looking to see the color of the hand you are reaching for, to decide is this a brother or sister of mine? Do they deserve my help, love, acts of charity? Take “deserve” out and just start doing.

    Comment by Ellen | Thursday, May 21, 2009 | Reply

  7. Thanks for the feedback Ellen,

    But I guess you’d have to read some of the previous comments that have been made by Carlton. Here is one that comes to mind:

    “People have all this nostalgia for the old movement from half a century ago. I love and appreciate it for what it’s done for me and my family, too; not to mention my community. But let’s not romanticize it-it demanded conformity (like some sort of color based Patriot Act). Black women pregnant outside of marriage were ostracized. Thinkers outside the church were banished. Black youth who had questions were beaten. Whatever was necessary to satisfy the needs of the church came first-individuality was tolerated at best. It was discipline that was necessary for progress. I don’t condemn it-it’s made my life a lot easier in THIS day and age. But I ain’t going back and neither are most black people (which renders most of your points moot).”

    It is implied that the organization of the black community is a thing of the past that has served its purpose and is no longer applicable to our future.

    And as far as the suggestion that white people embrace black history, I misspoke. Not every white person feels that black history is a problem. I apologize for making such a broad statement. But there are many white and black people who find black history distasteful. Carlton admitted he “ain’t going back”. I’m sure he wasn’t talking literally. He is talking about taking the lessons we learned from the past and not taking them forward to the black community’s future. It is better for the black community that we forget how we were able to make change for the community in general and instead progress on an individual basis.

    We teach our children that Lincoln freed the slaves but we do little to teach our children the full context of why Mr. Lincoln abolished slavery. The vast majority of black people are taught to worship and adore Mr. Lincoln. The first black president wants to model his presidency after Lincoln. But what did Mr. Lincoln really think of black people? American history teaches Lincoln freed the slaves. Black history would teach that Lincoln may have taken steps to end slavery but he did not do it out of a pursuit for racial equality. Lincoln was a racist who believed no Negro deserved equality.

    Unfortunately, not too many people take the time to learn true history. What we are taught is propaganda that makes heroes out of people who could not care less for black people.

    And you are right! Kids listen! For years, generations, and centuries, black children have learned that they are second class citizens. We see our children grow up in communities that are abandoned by people who move out as soon as they are financially able. Black and white children watch and listen as our society treats black people like an afterthought. Our children go into businesses and see the vast majority of people who are in charge are white and the majority of the people at the bottom are black. All of the people who run the office I work in are white, all of the people who clean the office are black. Kids are watching and learning.

    Turn on the television. Most of the new dramatic TV shows feature white leads with maybe one supporting black character if there is any at all. Kids are watching and learning that black people simply do not matter. And black people who do achieve some level of success are more than happy to adopt the type of thinking that they learned as kids when they were watching and listening and saw black people regularly regulated to the background of white people’s foreground.

    No one can fool children. And when children see that black people are America’s second class citizens, they adopt the philosophy that black people are America’s second class citizens.

    But I’m the one spreading venom. I’m the one other people have to come behind to repair the damage. In typical dominant community fashion we are more than happy to tolerate racial disparity. But let someone say that we live in a culture of racial disparity and I’m the one spreading venom and hate. Kids are watching and learning this as well.

    You asked me why do white people have to prove anything to black people. I could not agree more. White people shouldn’t have to prove anything. But the statement was made in context to Carlton’s comment that he feels that black people have to prove to white people that we are no threat to their interest. I was asking him that if we live in a racially equal world, why don’t white people prove that they are no threat to black people. But you skipped right over that part. He’s not the one spreading venom. He supports the racial status quo. I’m the trouble maker. That’s what our children are learning.

    Peace

    Comment by brotherpeacemaker | Friday, May 22, 2009 | Reply

  8. “Sure it’s going to be harder for them to get some things done than their white age mates. But they are the minority population in this country. Whites would be having the same problems we do if there were fewer of them than us-it’s intrinsic”

    Hahaha…so that small percentage of whites in South Africa were oppressed!You do not get it do you.

    Comment by RhondaCoca | Saturday, May 23, 2009 | Reply

  9. Carlton, I would like you to read “The Other America” by MLK were he said that the victories of the civil rights movement was not going to change the day to day lives of black people.

    It is nice to want to empower people. I believe in that strategy as well but what you are doing is not empowering but berating.

    Let me put this in historical context, Black radicals in the late 60s and 70s proclaimed that they were tired of “begging” which is why they rejected the civil rights establishment. Black Power meant self-empowerment, determination and running and controlling one’s own community. A central focus was institution building and changing the mentalities of black people away from being programmed by whites or self-destructive. However in order to do this, one would have to believe in black unity…you do not. In order to understand the plethora of issues one must understand the root of the problem…you seem not not or prefer to look over/deny it. Purveyors of Black Power who were marginalized and maligned by the same people who later turned around and called for black “personal responsiblity”. They understood the workings of what they saw as the “racist white power structure”. They believed that they cannot convince nor beg whites to accept them (which they had no interest in anyway). There philosophy was community empowerment and taking control of one’s own destiny. I think that this was highlighted in another post but as you claim that your philosophy is, these Black Power purveyors focus was on black people and not on white people (on us and not on them) I believe in this. This is different from what you believe in. You seem to understand why things are the way they are because you would prefer to preserve the status quo.

    Your understanding of black liberation movements, history and philosophy is rudimentary which is why you fail to understand the power of a collective. You can be an individual within a collective.

    Sadly, your belief system has been feed to you by the white power establishment who controls all forms of media and our educational institutions. Like most black people in this country, you ate it up and licked the plate.

    Comment by RhondaCoca | Saturday, May 23, 2009 | Reply

  10. To Carlton and Brotherpeacemaker,
    May OLODUMARE’s Blessings of Perfect Health,Peace,Happiness,
    Love and Harmony Rest upon you and your Household.
    Ashe!!!
    I am encouraged and inspired by the fires of your honest and sincere intercourse.

    It is my hope that our verbal and written communications
    move from debate to honest and discussion with the inten of
    overstanding and determined commitment to support and learn
    from each other INSPITE of our disagrements and failures.
    Often times debating gets over fueled by our passions and
    a spirit of hostility and obstacles gets evoked, thus a threat to our unity. I do know thouth that disagreement
    does not mean disunity.
    May you both Prosper Greatly as you travel and work your paths.
    I AM Akinwole

    Comment by Akinwole | Sunday, May 24, 2009 | Reply

  11. Carlton…lighten up some and uncock your weapons and be at peace with yourself. You will find we are not really in
    disagreement with you.
    keep up the good work.

    I AM Akinwole

    Comment by Akinwole | Sunday, May 24, 2009 | Reply


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